DIY Tutorial: Pressing board in ONE hour


Today I decided it was about time I make a real pressing station.  The ironing board with its cheap metal grate just was not cutting it.

While out earlier, I picked up two yards of muslin from Hobby Lobby ($6 with the 40 percent off coupon) and a 24-inch square (it’s really just under 24 inches) of ½ inch birch plywood from Lowe’s ($7.44).

Pressing board supplies wood batting muslin staple gun

This is seriously an easy project that takes approximately one hour to complete.

Lay the wood onto a scrap piece of cotton batting (ONLY use 100% cotton batting since this will have contact with your iron) and cut about 4 inches around on each side.  Starting from the middle, staple the batting to the wood, then move to the opposite side – pulling it taut.  Repeat with the remaining sides – making sure to staple carefully around the corners to eliminate bulk.

Pressing board supplies wood batting muslin staple gun

 

Pressing board supplies wood batting muslin staple gun

On the fold, cut the muslin to the dimensions 26 inches (perpendicular to the fold) and 26 ½ inches (parallel to the fold).

Pressing board supplies wood batting muslin staple gun

Take the end seams opposite the fold and press ¼ inch in, then again – so no raw edges are exposed.

Pressing board supplies wood batting muslin staple gun

Hem both sides – then use a zigzag stitch to enclose the two sides perpendicular to the fold.  This has created somewhat of a “pillow case” for the pressing board.

Pressing board supplies wood batting muslin staple gun

Pressing board supplies wood batting muslin staple gun pins pinning

 

Pressing board supplies wood batting muslin staple gun zigzag stitch

Turn right side out and insert the board.  That’s it!  Total cost for materials was under $20, although if you don’t have a staple gun that would be an additional cost.

Pressing board finished cotton batting muslin staple gun wood plywood birch

The best part about this method is that you can remove the case and launder it if needed.  You can also make additional cases and switch them out periodically.  I chose the tea dyed muslin because when scorch marks happen (and they will!) at least I won’t be bummed that it happened to my better fabric.

See you next time!

– Jennifer



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